Birth Certificate

 

09/30/2012 Updated Links:
New Birth Certificate Information (English)
New Birth Certificate Information (Spanish)

In December 2009, Puerto Rico enacted a new law to combat fraud and protect the identity of U.S. Citizens who were born in Puerto Rico. On July 1, 2010, the Puerto Rico Health Department’s Vital Statistics Record Office will begin issuing new birth certificates incorporating technology to limit the possibility of document forgery. The new birth certificates will cost $5 and if multiple copies are requested in the application, each additional birth certificate will cost $4 each. The fee will be waived for all Veterans and people over the age of 60.

To order your new birth certificate:

* Print the application
The application can be found here:
Birth Certificate Application in English | Birth Certificate Application in Spanish

* Include a photocopy of a valid government issued photo identification document. A passport or drivers license may be used; all other forms of government issued photo I.D. will be subject to approval.

* Include a $5.00 Money Order payable to the Secretary of the Treasury of Puerto Rico.

* Include a self-addressed envelope with paid postage.

* Then you send all of the above to one of the following addresses, depending on what mailing service you will be using.

If you are sending your application through the regular postal service, send your mail to:
Puerto Rico Vital Statistics Record Office
(Registro Demografico)
P.O. Box 11854
San Juan, PR 00910

If you are sending your applications through premium mail services (such as: FedEx, Express Mail, Registered Mail, UPS, etc.), send your mail to the following street address:
Puerto Rico Vital Statistics Record Office
(Registro Demografico)
171 Quisqueya Street
Hato Rey, PR 00917

For more information, visit http://www.prfaa.com/birthcertificates/ (English) or http://www.prfaa.com/certificadosdenacimiento/ (Spanish)

Updated Links (09/30/2012):
New Birth Certificate Information (English)
New Birth Certificate Information (Spanish)

More info and frequently asked questions in English and Spanish below:
——
In December 2009, the government of Puerto Rico enacted a new law (Law 191 of 2009) aimed at strengthening the issuance and usage of birth certificates to combat fraud and protect the identity and credit of all U.S. citizens born in Puerto Rico.

The new law was based on collaboration with the U.S. Department of State (DOS) and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to address the fraudulent use of Puerto Rico-issued birth certificates to unlawfully obtain U.S. passports, Social Security benefits, and other federal services. Law 191, which went into effect on January 1, 2010, implements the following changes:

1) On July 1, 2010, the Puerto Rico Health Department’s Vital Statistics Record Office will begin issuing new birth certificates incorporating technology to limit the possibility of document forgery. Until that date, all Puerto Rico birth certificates will remain valid. The law provides that the date of validity for the current birth certificates may be extended by the Puerto Rico Health Department if the new birth certificates are not ready to be issued on July 1, 2010. Public notice of such an extension would be provided.

2) The law creates a 15-day extended validity transition period for those birth certificates issued after June 15, 2010, and before July 1, 2010. For example, if a birth certificate is issued on June 29, 2010, it will be valid for all purposes until July 14, 2010, providing a grace period for those who need the documentation but are, for instance, traveling during the July 1, 2010 change over date.

3) As of January 1, 2010, the law also establishes that no public or private entity within the jurisdiction of Puerto Rico may retain an original copy of a Puerto Rico issued birth certificate. Local agencies in Puerto Rico, as well as private employers, may request to inspect birth certificates and even copy them, but cannot retain the original under any circumstance.

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: Why is there a need to issue new birth certificates in Puerto Rico starting on July 2010?

A: Puerto Rico birth certificates need to be made more secure because of the proven risks of identity fraud. This extraordinary measure had to be taken to protect the integrity of the identity, credit and citizenship of all individuals born in Puerto Rico. In addition, this measure is necessary to protect the security of all passports and to protect the nation against criminals who might try to appropriate the identity of a citizen by using a stolen birth certificate from Puerto Rico.

Q: On July 1, 2010, will everyone need to run out and get a copy of the new birth certificate right away?

A: No. The government of Puerto Rico recommends that only people who have a specific need for their birth certificate related to the usage of this document for official purposes (such as passport application, etc.) request a new birth certificate. Those people who want to obtain a copy of the new birth certificates for their records are encouraged to do so at a later date to prevent an unnecessary rush of applications and to ensure that those individuals who have a specific need for the birth certificates are able to obtain them in a timely fashion.

Q: How much will the new birth certificates cost?

A: All new birth certificates will cost $5. If multiple copies are requested with one application, all additional copies after the first will cost $4. The fees will be waived for all veterans and people over the age of 60. Most people will actually save money with this change because the new birth certificates issued after July 1, 2010, will have no expiration and citizens will no longer be required to submit multiple, original copies of their birth certificates for common transactions in Puerto Rico.

Q: How do I obtain a copy of the new, more secure birth certificate if I live outside of Puerto Rico?

A: Citizens born in Puerto Rico but residing elsewhere may obtain a copy of the new birth certificate by filling out a Birth Certificate Application form from the Puerto Rico Vital Statistics Record office on or after July 1, 2010. Additional information can be obtained at: www.prfaa.com/birthcertificates.

Once an applicant completes and signs the form, they should follow these steps:

1) Applicants residing outside of Puerto Rico may mail the completed application to the following address:

Puerto Rico Vital Statistics Record Office

(Registro Demografico)

P.O. Box 11854

San Juan, PR 00910

2) Include a photocopy of a valid government issued photo identification document. A passport or drivers license may be used; all other forms of government issued photo I.D. will be subject to approval.

3) Include a $5.00 Money Order payable to the Secretary of the Treasury of Puerto Rico.

4) Include a self-addressed envelope with paid postage.

To send applications through premium mail services (such as: FedEx, Express Mail, Registered Mail, UPS, etc.), correspondence should be directed to the following street address:

Puerto Rico Vital Statistics Record Office

(Registro Demografico)

171 Quisqueya Street

Hato Rey, PR 00917

Q: Who can obtain a birth certificate?

A: An individual may obtain their own birth certificate as long they are 18 years or older and were born in Puerto Rico. Interested parties may also obtain copies of an individual’s birth certificate if they are the individual’s parents, legal guardians, heirs or a person duly authorized by the courts.

Q: What happens if someone asks me for an original birth certificate and tells me that they will need to keep it to process a transaction?

A: The law clearly establishes that in Puerto Rico, for any purpose for which a birth certificate is needed as proof of identity, it will be sufficient for an individual to present (not give) the original copy of the birth certificate issued by the Vital Statistics Record Office. The law allows for the submission, retention and filling of photocopies, in either digital or paper format, of the birth certificate, but expressly prohibits any public or private entity from retaining an original birth certificate under any circumstance. Under the laws of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, any entity that violates this prohibition will be subject to a criminal misdemeanor, and could be held liable in civil court for the totality of any damages that may be incurred by any interested party affected by the violation of this law.

_____________________________

Spanish Version

Ley de Certificados de Nacimiento de Puerto Rico (Ley 191 de 2009)

Hoja de Informacion

En diciembre del 2009, el Gobierno de Puerto Rico aproba una nueva ley (Ley 191 de 2009) con el fin de fortalecer la expedicion y uso de certificados de nacimiento, para combatir prácticas fraudulentas y proteger la identidad y el credito de todos aquellos nacidos en Puerto Rico. La nueva ley responde a un llamado del Departamento de Estado de los Estados Unidos, as­ como del Departamento de Seguridad Nacional (DHS, por sus siglas en ingles) para atender el uso fraudulento de certificados de nacimiento otorgados en Puerto Rico, que frecuentemente se utilizan para obtener de manera ilegal pasaportes de Estados Unidos, beneficios de Seguro Social, y otros servicios federales.

Concientes de los enormes riesgos para las personas víctimas de estas prácticas ila­citas y las preocupaciones significativas que esta situacion ha desencadenado en terminos de seguridad nacional, el Gobierno de Puerto Rico toma las acciones inmediatas para mejorar la seguridad de los certificados de nacimiento y proteger asa­ al publico de fraude y robo de identidad.

La ley 191 del 2009, que entra en vigor el 1ero de enero del 2010, establece los siguientes cambios:

1) A partir del 1ero de julio de 2010, el Registro Demografico de Puerto Rico comenzar a emitir nuevos certificados de nacimiento que incorporan tecnologi­a para limitar la posibilidad de que se falsifiquen los documentos. Hasta esa fecha todos los certificados de nacimiento actuales emitidos en Puerto Rico continuaran siendo validos. La ley permite que la fecha de validez de los certificados de nacimiento actuales se pueda extender por el Departamento de Salud de Puerto Rico si los certificados de nacimiento nuevos no estan disponibles para ser emitidos en el 1 de julio de 2010. De ese ser el caso, se emitir un aviso publico sobre la extension del periodo de vigencia de los certificados actuales.

2) La ley establece un periodo de transición con 15 días de validez extendida para aquellos certificados de nacimiento que sean emitidos después del 15 de junio del 2010 y antes del 1 de julio del 2010. Por ejemplo, un certificado de nacimiento que sea expedido el 29 de junio de 2010 será válido hasta el 14 de julio de 2010, para proveer así un periodo de gracia para aquellas personas que necesitan el documento pero que, en casos como en que la persona se encuentre viajando para el 1ero de julio, pueda tener su documento vigencia por ese espacio de 15 días a partir de que se expida el mismo.

3) A partir del 1ero de enero de 2010, la ley también establece que ninguna entidad, sea pública o privada en la jurisdicción de Puerto Rico podrá retener el original de los certificados de nacimiento que son expedidos en Puerto Rico. Las agencias locales o patronos de la empresa privada podrán solicitar y verificar el certificado en original o sacarle una copia, pero no podrán retener el original bajo ninguna circunstancia.

Preguntas Frecuentes y Contestaciones

P: ¿Por qué se necesita emitir nuevos certificados de nacimiento de Puerto Rico en julio del 2010?

C: Es necesario mejorar la seguridad de todos los certificados de nacimiento de personas nacidas en Puerto Rico a causa de los riesgos probados del fraude de identidad. Esta medida extraordinaria era necesaria para proteger la integridad de la identidad, el crédito y la ciudadanía de toda persona nacida en Puerto Rico. Esta iniciativa también era necesaria para proteger la seguridad de todos los pasaportes y para proteger a nuestra nación contra aquellos criminales que intenten apropiarse de la identidad de un ciudadano Americano utilizando un certificado de nacimiento de Puerto Rico hurtado.

P: El 1ero de julio del 2010, ¿tendrá todo el mundo que ir corriendo a buscar un certificado de nacimiento nuevo?

C: No. El gobierno de Puerto Rico recomienda que sólo soliciten el nuevo certificado para aquella fecha aquellas personas que tengan una necesidad específica y urgencia de obtenerlo y utilizarlo para propósitos oficiales (como sería la solicitud de un pasaporte, etc.). Recomendamos que aquellos que interesen obtener su nuevo certificado de nacimiento para guardarlo en sus archivos soliciten el mismo en fechas posteriores para prevenir que haya un aumento significativo en el volumen de solicitudes y garantizar así que aquellos que realmente necesiten el mismo puedan obtenerlo en un tiempo razonable.

P: ¿Cuánto cuesta el nuevo certificado?

C: Todo certificado nuevo tendrá un costo de $5. Si se solicitan varias copias en originales en la misma solicitud, toda copia original adicional tendrá un costo de $4. Estarán exentos del pago todos los veteranos y personas mayores de 60 años. La mayoría de las personas verán un ahorro con la nueva ley, ya que los certificados de nacimiento expedidos luego del 1ero de julio de 2010 no tendrán fecha de expiración y los ciudadanos no tendrán que presentar múltiples copias en original para transacciones en Puerto Rico como ocurría en el pasado.

Hoja de Información – Ley de Certificados de Nacimiento de Puerto Rico (Ley 191 de 2009)

P: ¿Cómo obtengo una copia en original del nuevo certificado de nacimiento que es más seguro si vivo fuera de Puerto Rico?

C: Aquellos ciudadanos nacidos en Puerto Rico pero que viven en el exterior podrán obtener una copia en su original del nuevo certificado llenando una solicitud de Certificado de Nacimiento del Registro Demográfico en o después del 1ero de julio de 2010. Puede obtener la solicitud accediendo a la página:

http://www.prfaa.com/certificadosdenacimiento/

Una vez la persona interesada llene la solicitud y firme el formulario deberán seguir las siguientes instrucciones:

1) Toda persona que llene la solicitud viviendo fuera de Puerto Rico, podrá enviar la solicitud a la siguiente dirección:

Registro Demográfico

P.O. Box 11854

San Juan, PR 00910

2) Deberá incluir una copia de una identificación con foto de un documento válido emitido por gobierno. Se aceptan pasaportes o licencias de conducir. Otro tipo de identificación será sujeta para su aprobación.

3) Incluir un giro postal de $5.00 dirigido al Secretario de Hacienda de Puerto Rico.

4) Incluir un sobre predirigido y un sello prepagado.

Si va a enviar la solicitud mediante otros servicios de correo como FedEx, Express Mail, Correo Certificado, UPS, etc., entonces la correspondencia debe ser enviada a la siguiente dirección física:

Registro Demográfico

Calle Quisqueya 171

Hato Rey, PR 00917

P: ¿Quién puede obtener un certificado de nacimiento?

C: Toda persona que haya nacido en Puerto Rico y sea de 18 años o más podrá obtener su propia copia en original de su certificado de nacimiento. Las partes interesadas también podrán obtener el certificado de nacimiento de otra persona, si son los padres, tutores, herederos, y personas autorizadas por los tribunales.

P: ¿Qué sucede si alguien me pide un original de mi certificado de nacimiento y dicen que se tienen que quedar con el mismo para completar alguna transacción?

C: La ley claramente establece que en Puerto Rico, para propósitos de probar la identidad de la persona, será suficiente que la persona muestre y no entregue la copia original del certificado emitido por el Registro Demográfico. La ley permite entregar, retener y guardar fotocopias, ya sea en digital o en papel, de un certificado de nacimiento pero prohíbe que, bajo ningún concepto, entidades públicas o privadas puedan retener un certificado de nacimiento en original. Bajo las leyes del Gobierno de Puerto Rico, cualquier entidad que incumpla esta cláusula, se expone a enfrentar un delito menos grave, y podrá ser procesado en su carácter civil por la totalidad o cualquier daño a cualquiera de las partes afectadas por violaciones a la ley.

Source: Congressman John B. Larson

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

3 comments

%d bloggers like this: